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Senior Decision Day: Administration’s Failure

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For many seniors, getting accepted into college is a huge deal. They may post on social media, and go around telling their friends, but announcing it in front of the entire school is not something seniors see as “fun”.

    While the idea is intended as a way for seniors to find other people going to the same college as them, it can often be degrading for people thinking of going to community colleges, or taking a break, or gap year from school. The stigma around community college, especially Washtenaw Community College, (WCC) is not something seniors would like to deal with in front of their peers. For many, community college is a gateway to other, larger, universities. It may also help students boost their grades, and show universities that they are able to handle adulthood, as well as keeping up with a course.

    College decision day also strengthens the idea of many Ann Arbor students that they MUST go to U of M, since so many seniors end up going there. This causes many students to stress more than they should over SAT scores, and their GPA’s. Especially during junior year, because colleges look a lot at sophomore and junior year. The stress students experience due to the high expectations of needing to get into U of M, which has an acceptance rate of 28.6%, causes a large deterioration of their mental health.

    Hosting a College Decision Day in which only seniors who chose to go, or who signed up to go would be much more convenient. That way, students wouldn’t miss classes, and it would give administrators a much better idea of how many people to expect, and how much time is required for the seniors to announce their decisions. The whole school does not need to hear where seniors are going. Putting it bluntly, most underclassmen only know 5-10 seniors at most, and will either leave halfway through the assembly, or just not show up to school.

    The intense dislike of the idea of a College Decision Assembly was proven in the fact that only about fifty seniors actually showed up. This caused the already out of place schedule to get further messed around, and confusion for many students.

    Overall, a College Decision Day is a driver for anxiety, and stress for all classes, whether it’s worrying about judgement from peers, stigma around community college, or stressing about grades and scores more than is needed. Administration should consider other alternatives to this idea, as it has demonstrated itself as not the best idea, and while there are good intentions surrounding it, many fail to see this.

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